Press Kit: “Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes”

Book TitleTruly Texas Mexican:  A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes
Author:  Adán Medrano
A history and cookbook: delectably steeped in tradition, a living culinary heritage

Truly Texas Mexican_coverPublished by Texas Tech University Press

May 9, 2014, Cloth, flexibound
ISBN-10: 0896728501
ISBN-13: 978-0896728509
Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.6 x 8 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
8 x 8, 256 pages; index
57 color photographs, 100 recipes

 

Publicist: John Brock, Marketing Coordinator
Texas Tech University Press
806-834-5609
806-742-2979 (fax)
JOHN.BROCK@ttu.edu

Named Finalist, “Book Of The Year” by Foreword Reviews’ INDIEFAB

Editorial Reviews

Finalist, 2015  “Book Of The Year” – Foreword Reviews
“Recipes and personal anecdotes illuminate the role that cuisine plays in identity and community.”

Cowboys And Indians Magazine “Medrano’s tome is well-researched and well-illustrated with maps and appetite-stirring photographs of dishes like grilled clams in tequila broth; watermelon canapés with avocado, serrano, and grapes; and a red jalapeño champagne cocktail…It is truly a delight.”

Midwest Book Review   “Illustrated with full-color, full-page photography of its sumptuous dishes on virtually every other page, Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage in Recipes is a wonderful treasury of 100 kitchen-tested recipes showcasing the heritage of Texas Mexican cuisine. From tasty Beef Tamales to Potato and Egg Tacos, Crab and Avocado Cocktail, Hibiscus Drink and much more, Truly Texas Mexican features flavors to remember. A superb addition to cookbook shelves!

Garden & Gun Magazine   “Truthfully, Adán Medrano has no real issues with processed cheese or greasy refried beans. But in his recent cookbook, Truly Texas Mexican, the San Antonio native outlines a different kind of Texas cooking, with recipes that rely upon fewer–and fresher–ingredients. “Texas Mexican” food begins centuries before the first Europeans set foot in the United States, with the simmering beans and roast wild chiles of the tribes that first inhabited the Lone Star State, and continues into the homes of families across the Southwest today–including his own.”

The Wall Street Journal, Mumbai, India   “Mexican Wave–Three new caterers use fresh ingredients and authentic methods to make Mexican food that goes beyond Tex-Mex and tacos:  Dsouza attributes his style of cooking to the chefs he respects: Adán Medrano, author of Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes and Rick Bayless….”

The Dallas Morning News   “For the cook who’s also a history buff, Houston chef Adán Medrano’s Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage in Recipes is a wonderful journey into the culinary history of the border region encompassing parts of Texas and Mexico before the border existed.
“It’s a carefully researched, easy-to-read narrative interwoven with Medrano’s own family heritage. The recipes include lots of insider tips on how to coax the best from each ingredient, from chiles to avocados. Also, the recipes aren’t hobbled with the kind of authenticity that makes you reluctant to try them, yet they honor the past and help us understand why we cook the way we do.”

The San Antonio Express-News   ” ‘The flavor profile, the character of the food is like the land, straightforward, with no pretense,” he said. ‘The food says something about the character of Mexican-Americans.
‘Tex-Mex’ cuisine, on the other hand, developed from restaurateurs who moved to Texas from other places and created their own version of the cuisine that was already here….The book aims not only to define a cuisine, but a sense of identity for Mexican-Americans.”

The Texas Observer  “Truly Texas Mexican is at least as much manifesto as recipe collection.…Through all of the mostly violent transformations visited upon the indigenous peoples of Texas, Medrano said, ‘Food was the cultural activity that held us together. Cooking nurtured our remembering; through it we invented new identities rooted in that remembering. Preparing food was a day-by-day regeneration.”

SavorSA “Tex-Mex has had its story told in the works of writers such as Robb Walsh. Now it is time for the Texas Mexicans to have their foods and their heritage acknowledged, which is what Medrano’s book provides.”

The Austin Chronicle  “Medrano traces his lineage to the indigenous peoples who lived on both sides of the Rio Grande in what Europeans would eventually call Mexico. He grew up eating and cooking the foods of that heritage, recreating dishes and techniques passed down in his family for centuries. Before the publication of his book, he spent years researching the history of his native foods, convinced it was necessary to identify and record a distinct regional cuisine he calls Texas Mexican food. That’s exactly what he’s done. Truly Texas Mexican offers 100 well-documented recipes that clearly represent the native cuisine of Northern Mexico and South Texas….  It’s a thought-provoking volume that is a necessary addition to the culinary library of any serious student of the foodways of the Americas.”

What Scholars and Chefs Are Saying About:  “Truly Texas Mexican”

Dr. Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Mexican Food Historian, University of Toronto/Scarborough:  “Within the last ten years, people have started recognizing the cuisine (Tex-Mex) as an original American regional food. While this has been a worthy change, people have not really traced the roots of the cuisine, particularly to the distinctive indigenous groups of the region, which is what Adán does.”

Dr. Mario Montaño, Chair of the Department of Anthropology at Colorado College:  “Medrano is making a scholarly contribution to documenting the lives of working class Mexicans of South Texas by going to the archaeological record and making the argument that those [native] people had [their own] way of cooking. What he’s doing is providing this history which has been neglected or suppressed.”

Chef Alain Dubernard CMB, The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio:  “Adán Medrano speaks from his roots and shares his passion for food, providing an insightful perspective on an often mischaracterized Texas Mexican cuisine.”

Chef Johnny Hernandez, Chef/Owner of La Gloria Street Foods of Mexico, The Frutería-Botanero, and El Machito:  “In the deepest part of our soul we are celebrating food and hospitality. These recipes share not only where our culinary traditions come from, but the resiliency of our ancestors and the healing power of food.”

Diana Barrios Trevino, Owner of Los Barrios Enterprises:   “Adán Medrano is putting the spotlight on a style of food that often has been overlooked. Once you explore this remarkable Texas Mexican cuisine you will discover a richness that will be cherished for generations to come.”

About The Author

AMChefPicSmdgsmlChef and food writer Adán Medrano is a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and holds an M.A. degree from the University of Texas, Austin. Now living in Houston, he grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and in northern Mexico, where he developed his expertise in the flavor profile and techniques of indigenous Texas Mexican food. Medrano’s professional experience includes fine dining venues such as “Restaurant Ten Bogaerde” in Koksijde, Belgium, cooking demonstrations in Amsterdam and showcasing his recipes at “Nao,” the CIA restaurant in San Antonio.

Synopsis of the History/Cookbook

Over thousands of years, Native Americans in what is now Texas passed down their ways of roasting, boiling, steaming, salting, drying, grinding, and blending. From one generation to another, these ancestors of Texas’s Mexican American community lent their culinary skills to combining native and foreign ingredients into the flavor profile of indigenous Texas Mexican cooking today.

Building on what he learned from his own family, Adán Medrano captures this distinctive flavor profile in 100 kitchen-tested recipes, each with step-by-step instructions. Equally as careful with history, he details how hundreds of indigenous tribes in Texas gathered and hunted food, planted gardens, and cooked.

Offering new culinary perspective on well-known dishes such as enchiladas and tamales, Medrano explains the complexities of aromatic chiles and how to develop flavor through technique as much as ingredients. Sharing freely the secrets of lesser-known culinary delights, such as turcos, a sweet pork pastry served as dessert, and posole, giant white corn treated with calcium hydroxide, he illuminates the mouth-watering interconnectedness of culture and cuisine.

The recipes and personal anecdotes shared in Truly Texas Mexican illuminate the role that cuisine plays in identity and community.

 

Two Boston Book Signings Rediscover Native American/Latina Food

Truly Texas Mexican_coverBoston–- The Latina and Latino, indigenous cuisine of Texas takes the spotlight this week in Boston when Harvard University Coop and Northeastern University Xhibition Kitchen host book-signings and a cooking demonstration with Chef Adán Medrano, author of “Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes.” The cookbook features 100 kitchen-tested recipes, and also documents the culinary history of the indigenous Latino and Latina people of Texas.  According to the book, the cuisine has a 10,000-year history.

Over thousands of years, Native Americans in what is now Texas passed down their ways of roasting, boiling, steaming, salting, drying, grinding, and blending. From one generation to another, these ancestors of Texas’s Latino, Mexican American community lent their culinary skills to combining native and foreign ingredients into the flavor profile of indigenous Texas Mexican cooking today.

Building on what he learned from his own family, Adán Medrano captures this distinctive flavor profile in 100 kitchen-tested recipes, each with step-by-step instructions. Equally as careful with history, he details how hundreds of indigenous tribes in Texas gathered and hunted food, planted gardens, and cooked.

Medrano says that “Tex-Mex” is not the subject of his book nor his 100 recipes. According to his book, which is part of an academic series published by Texas Tech University Press in Lubbock, “Tex-Mex” is a restaurant format that began in San Antonio in 1900 and is a variation of Texas Mexican cuisine which has much older historical roots in the state. The differences are detailed in “Truly Texas Mexican,” which is a combination of history and cookbook.

Offering new culinary perspective on well-known dishes such as enchiladas and tamales, Medrano explains the complexities of aromatic chiles and how to develop flavor through technique as much as ingredients. Sharing freely the secrets of lesser-known culinary delights, such as turcos, a sweet pork pastry served as dessert, and posole, giant white corn treated with calcium hydroxide, he illuminates the mouth-watering interconnectedness of culture and cuisine.

The recipes and personal anecdotes shared in Truly Texas Mexican illuminate the role that cuisine plays in identity and community.

The book signings and cooking demo will take place:
October 14th, Harvard University 7:00 PM
Harvard Cooperative Society (The Coop)
1400 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138

October 15th, Northeastern University 12:00 – 1:00 PM
Xhibition Kitchen
11 Speare Place inside Stetson West Eatery

REVIEWS:
“Medrano’s tome is well-researched and well-illustrated with maps and appetite-stirring photographs of dishes like grilled clams in tequila broth; watermelon canapés with avocado, serrano, and grapes; and a red jalapeño champagne cocktail…he reclaims native foods (squash, corn, cactus) and dispenses of the <Tex-Mex> processed glop that has come to weigh down our combo platters. Truly Texas Mexican shows us the diversity and joy of Lone Star possibilities through our history and our palates. It is truly a delight.”
   — Cowboys And Indians Magazine

“Adán Medrano speaks from his roots and shares his passion for food, providing an insightful perspective on an often mischaracterized Texas Mexican cuisine.”
   ―Alain Dubernard, CMB, The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio

“treasury of 100 kitchen-tested recipes showcasing the heritage of Texas Mexican cuisine. From tasty Beef Tamales to Potato and Egg Tacos, Crab and Avocado Cocktail, Hibiscus Drink and much more, Truly Texas Mexican features flavors to remember. A superb addition to cookbook shelves!”
  — Midwest Book Review

“In the deepest part of our soul we are celebrating food and hospitality. These recipes share not only where our culinary traditions come from, but the resiliency of our ancestors and the healing power of food.”
   ―Johnny Hernandez, chef/owner of La Gloria Street Foods of Mexico, The Frutería-Botanero, and El Machito

“Texas Mexican food begins centuries before the first Europeans set foot in the United States, with the simmering beans and roast wild chiles of the tribes that first inhabited the Lone Star State, and continues into the homes of families across the Southwest today—including his own.”
   –Garden & Gun Magazine

“Adán Medrano is putting the spotlight on a style of food that often has been overlooked. Once you explore this remarkable Texas Mexican cuisine you will discover a richness that will be cherished for generations to come.”
   —Diana Barrios Trevino, owner of Los Barrios Enterprises

“Tex-Mex has had its story told in the works of writers such as Robb Walsh. Now it is time for the Texas Mexicans to have their foods and their heritage acknowledged, which is what Medrano’s book provides.”
   — John Griffin, SavorSA

“Within the last ten years, people have started recognizing the cuisine (Tex-Mex) as an original American regional food. While this has been a worthy change, people have not really traced the roots of the cuisine, particularly to the distinctive indigenous groups of the region, which is what Adán does.”
— Jeffrey Pilcher, PhD, Professor, Food History, University of Toronto Scarborough

About Chef Adán Medrano

Chef and food writer Adán Medrano is a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and holds an M.A. degree from the University of Texas, Austin. Now living in Houston, he grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and in northern Mexico, where he developed his expertise in the flavor profile and techniques of indigenous Texas Mexican food.  Medrano’s professional experience includes fine dining venues such as “Restaurant Ten Bogaerde” in Koksijde, Belgium, cooking demonstrations in Amsterdam and showcasing his recipes at “Nao,” the CIA restaurant in San Antonio.

ChileRellenoMartinezCesar

Chile Relleno, one of the 100 recipes in “Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes.” Photo by César Martínez

 

“Truly Texas Mexican” Recipes Featured in West Texas Cookbook Gala

One of the pleasures, honors really, that this book has brought me is to be able to help raise funds for libraries.  Last month we raised funds for the San Antonio Library Latino Resources Center and the glittering evening was meaningful because it will help generations to come.  Next week I will be in Abilene, Texas, invited by the Friends Of The Library, for a book signing event and a gala dinner that will feature four Texas cookbook authors.  It’s a privilege to join the other authors, whom I admire, and help the Abilene Library.

I thought I’d share the menu that the chefs of the Abilene Country Club will prepare for the black-tie gala.  The chefs selected recipes from all four cookbooks and I’m looking forward to this marvelous gala dining experience.

WEST TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL COOKBOOK GALA
September 25, 2014 – 6:00 p.m.
Abilene Country Club – 4039 Treadaway Blvd.

MENU & WINE PAIRINGS

Hors d’ Oeuvres
Polenta Rounds with Cheese, Chive Pesto, and Red Pepper — Pastry Queen Parties

Ancho Chile Meatballs — Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage in Recipes
Landon Sparkling Red Moscato
Lost Oak Blanc du Bois

Dinner Menu
Soup: Sopa de Lima — The Homesick Texan’s Family Table: Lone Star Cooking from My Kitchen to Yours
                                                                                Traditional Pairing: Yellow Rose, Landon Winery
Daring Paring:   2012 Chenin Blanc, Becker Vineyards

Salad: El rancho Chopped Salad with Cornbread Croutons and Creamy Poblano Dressing — Pastry Queen Parties
Traditional Pairing: 2013 Vermentino, Los Pinos Ranch Vineyards
Daring Paring:   2013 Provencal Becker Winery
First Entrée:
Crab Cakes with Chipotle Yerbaniz Mayonnaise— Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage in Recipes

Traditional Pairing: 2012 Viognier, Becker Winery
Daring Paring: 2012 La Reina Tempranillo, Red Caboose

Intermezzo:
Watermelon Ice with Blueberries — Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage in RecipesRaspaSandiasml

Second Entrée: Jalapeno Pesto Stuffed Pork Roast with Orange Asparagus — The Homesick Texan’s Family Table: Lone Star Cooking from My Kitchen to Yours
and Purple Chipotle Garlic Mashed Potatoes    — The Texas Holiday Cookbook

Traditional Pairing: 2012 Dawson Red, Lost Oak Winery
Daring Paring: Riesling, Landon Winery

Dessert:
Capirotada — Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage in Recipes

Traditional Pairing: Port Style “Some of that Red”, Red Caboose
Daring Paring:           Besitos de Chocolate, Los Pinos Ranch Vineyards

Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes

This new book by Adán Medrano is the culinary history of Native Americans in Texas, ancestors of today’s Mexican American Community.  With 100 recipes, it demonstrates the delicious flavor profile of Texas Mexican cuisine.  It is published by Texas Tech University Press in the series of Studies In The American Southwest.

Pre-order now at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.com

TrulyTexasMexicansmlWhat Chef’s are saying about Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes

“Adán Medrano speaks from his roots and shares his passion for food, providing an insightful perspective on an often mischaracterized Texas Mexican cuisine.”
Alain Dubernard, CMB, The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio

 

“In the deepest part of our soul we are celebrating food and hospitality. These recipes share not only where our culinary traditions come from, but the resiliency of our ancestors and the healing power of food. “
Johnny Hernandez
, chef/owner of La Gloria Street Foods of Mexico, The Frutería-Botanero, and El Machito

 

“Adán Medrano is putting the spotlight on a style of food that often has been overlooked. Once you explore this remarkable Texas Mexican cuisine you will discover a richness that will be cherished for generations to come.”
Diana Barrios Trevino, owner of Los Barrios Enterprises

OVER THOUSANDS OF YEARS, Native Americans in what is now Texas passed down their ways of roasting, boiling, steaming, salting, drying, grinding, and blending. From one generation to another, these ancestors of Texas’s Mexican American community lent their culinary skills to combining native and foreign ingredients into the flavor profile of indigenous Texas Mexican cooking today.

Building on what he learned from his own family, Adán Medrano captures this distinctive flavor profile in 100 kitchen-tested recipes, each with step-by-step instructions. Equally as careful with history, he details how hundreds of indigenous tribes in Texas gathered and hunted food, planted gardens, and cooked.

Offering new culinary perspective on well-known dishes such 
as enchiladas and tamales, Medrano explains the complexities of aromatic chiles and how to develop flavor through technique as much as ingredients. Sharing freely the secrets of lesser-known culinary delights, such as turcos, a sweet pork pastry served as dessert, and posole, giant white corn treated with calcium hydroxide, he illuminates the mouth- watering interconnectedness of culture and cuisine.

The recipes and personal anecdotes shared in Truly Texas Mexican illuminate the role that cuisine plays in identity and community.

AMChefCordonBleu

Adán Medrano (right) at Le Cordon Bleu, Paris, with Chef Frédéric Lesourd.

Chef and food writer Adán Medrano holds a Certificate in Culinary Arts from the Culinary Institute of America. He grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and in northern Mexico, where he developed his expertise in the flavor profile and techniques of indigenous Texas Mexican food.

Videos

We make media productions and believe that “local and seasonal” applies to media as well as to food.  As more and more grassroots communities become involved in making their own media, telling their own stories in the formats and idioms that are true to their character and manner of expression, the more enjoyable and impactful the media productions will become.

Making Chile in a Molcajete is an ancient art that fits today’s lifestyles.

 

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Chef Johnny Hernandez, San Antonio, on chef/owners and TexMex food.

 

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Chef Iliana De La Vega on the art of delicious food and on the pitfalls of food stereotypes.

 

Chef Hinnerk Von Bargen explains how with chain restaurants, “something is lost in translation.”

 

Chef Alain Dubernard on Pastry and Passion:  it’s not just about milk, flour and eggs.

About Us and Our Work/Passion

We are a media & food production and research group with a focus on the cultural and social issues surrounding food and cooking in people’s lives.

gordiatasguacsmlWe are in Houston, Texas
T: 713-524-1628
F: 713-524-1648
Email: cholmes@jmcommunications.com

JM Communications was founded in 1985 to explore contemporary issues of culture and media.  In 2005 the culinary arts became the focus of our work: the cultural and social issues surrounding food and cooking in people’s lives.  Our activities are twofold: making food and making media.

Cooking food is essential to our work.  In our test kitchen we create specialized dishes that we cater for special occasions.  Our catering business is called “Truly Texas Mexican” and specializes in indigenous Texas Mexican cuisine.

Our three main interests are:

  • Cooking and serving delicious food that speaks to our identity at this time, in this place.
  • Producing and reflecting on everyday digital media practices that revolve around food production, cooking and eating.
  • Researching trends in contemporary cooking with a focus on Latin American and Texas Mexican.
    We define “Texas Mexican” as the cuisine of Texas Native Americans who eventually became the Mexican community in Texas. Texas Native American (“Indian”) cuisine dates back to AD 900 and predates both Texas and Mexico. The more widely used term, “Tex-Mex” refers to recent restaurant food whose origins date to the 1900s.
    We explore the following issues through cooking, media productions, research and symposia:
  • The history of authentic Texas Mexican cuisine dating back to the original Texas Native Americans, aka, Texas Indians,
  • Fine dining and sustainable food production,
  • Emerging digital media practices and their role in eating and cooking habits
  • The role of chefs in social and political discourse
  • Recipes that are authentic but also changing.
  • Cultural identity and methods of cooking
  • Entertainment and food
  • Centralized, corporate food production,
  • Best practices and fair wages in food production and transportation,
  • Food as Art.

carneguisadatacosmlThe background of Adán Medrano, principal, combines media and culinary arts.

Education
2010 Culinary Institute of America, Certificate in Culinary Arts

2007 Hotelschool Koksijde “Ter Duinen,” Belgium.
Restaurant Ten Bogaerde, Koksijde, Belgium

1995 Sabbatical: Implications of Digital Technologies for Non-profits

1985 Sabbatical: European Broadcasting Systems and Independent Not-for-Profit Producers

1977 Master of Arts in Radio, TV, Film, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas

1970 Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and Journalism, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska

Career
Present JM Communications, Chef and Food Writer/Online Media Producer

Author: Truly Texas Mexican: A Native Culinary Heritage In Recipes published by Texas Tech University Press.

2012 Visiting Lecturer, “Texas Mexican Cuisine and History,” Colorado College, Department of Anthropology

2010 Chef, Radical Eats Restaurant, Houston, Texas

2009 Chef, Casa Juan Diego, Houston, Texas

1986-2008 JM Communications, Program Director of the Foundations Grant-Making Program in Media and Communications.

-Award financial grants and manage the grant-making program in support of educational, religious and social not-for-profit organizations in Latin American countries including Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay, Paraguay, Mexico and the Caribbean.
– Award financial grants and manage the grant-making program in support of educational, religious and social not-for-profit organizations in The Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and Indonesia,
-Evaluate media projects that received Foundation financial support in Great Britain, Belgium, France, Spain, The Netherlands, Germany, Ireland, Sweden and Canada.

-Producer and Writer

1981  Founding President, Hispanic Telecommunications Network

1980  CBS Television Network, New York, national news producer

1975 Founder, Annual Chicano Latino Film Festival, San Antonio CineFestival

AMChefPicSmdgsmlSelected Professional Productions and Services

Latin American Chamber of Commerce of Georgia (2012), Culinary Consultant

“Notes on Cooking” (2011). Video series on cultural and social issues surrounding contemporary food and cooking.

The Candy Shop,” an Art Exhibit (2011). Cook and present Mexican candies as art objects, a
collaboration with three visual artists and sculptors.

“adansblog.com” (2008). review of Texas Mexican food, resources, and history.

“Mexican American Cultural Center Mission” (2009) DVD documentary, Telly Award, The Communicatior Award

“Portraits of Faith: The Church in America” (2004) DVD documentary. Gabriel Award.  Fulton J Sheen Award, Telly Award.

“Belief in Media” (2004) Editor, co-edited book published by Ashgate Publishing Limited, Great Britan.

“Hope In A Time of AIDS”(2000) half-hour television program. Telly Award, American Medical Association Media Award.

“Soul Of The City” (1996). half-hour television program. International Film and Video Festival Certificate of Excellence. Gabriel Award. Broadcast on PBS and in Belgium.

“Living with AIDS: An Occasion of Grace” (1994) 30‑minute TV documentary. Gabriel Award, Gold Plaque at the Chicago International Film and Video Festival.

“Comunidad” (1993) 20‑minute video documentary. Proclaim Award.

“I Work The Land” (1990) Certificate for Creative Excellence, US International Film and Video Festival

“Vocación”(1994) 10‑minute video documentary. Proclaim Award.

“Quince Años” (1996) Bronze Plaque at the WorldFest Houston.

“Las Posadas” (1978) half‑hour Christmas TV Special. Certificate of Excellence, Information Film Producers of America, Inc.

Selected Professional Activities

THE WHITE HOUSE
.Consultant on development of policy for minority ownership in broadcasting

THE VATICAN, PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR SOCIAL COMMUNICATIONS
.Invited expert, committee to write the papal document, “Aetatis Novae”

TEXAS COMMISSION ON THE ARTS
.Commissioner, Appointed by Governor of the State of Texas

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS
.Policy Panel for Media Arts

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES
.Review Panel for Public Programs

CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING
.Review Panel, Proposal evaluation

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CATHOLIC BISHOPS/UNITED STATES CATHOLIC CONFERENCE
.Communications Committee

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
.Film Committee

FRESH ARTS COALITION, HOUSTON
.Board of Directors

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LATINO ARTS AND CULTURE
.Board of Directors

INTERNATIONAL STUDY COMMISSION ON MEDIA, RELIGION AND CULTURE
.Board of Directors

SOUTHWEST ALTERNATE MEDIA PROJECT
.President, Board of Directors

THE AURORA PICTURE SHOW
.Board of Directors

CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
.Juror, The Ecumenical Jury

CARTAGENA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
.Juror, The Ecumenical Jury

SAN SEBASTIAN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
.Juror, The Ecumenical Jury

CULTURAL ARTS COUNCIL OF HOUSTON
.Board of Directors

Welcome, Bienvenida!

Bienvenido a JM Communications

RajassquaresmlWe combine food and media because they exist together naturally in our lives.  We believe that “Local and Seasonal” applies to both.

We are in Houston, Texas
T: 713-524-1628
F: 713-524-1648
Email: cholmes@jmcommunications.com

 

We are a media & food production and research group with a focus on the cultural and social issues surrounding food and cooking in people’s lives.

Cooking food is essential to our work.  In our test kitchen we create specialized dishes and also cater for special occasions.

 

 

 

 

Our three main interests are:

  • Cooking and serving delicious food that speaks to our identity at this time, in this place.
  • Producing and reflecting on everyday digital media practices that revolve around food production, cooking and eating.
  • Researching trends in contemporary cooking with a focus on Latin American and Texas Mexican.
    We define “Texas Mexican” as the cuisine of Texas Native Americans who eventually became the Mexican community in Texas. Texas Native American (“Indian”) cuisine dates back to AD 900 and predates both Texas and Mexico. The more widely used term, “Tex-Mex” refers to recent restaurant food whose origins date to the 1920’s.
    We explore the following issues through cooking, media productions, research and symposia:
  • The history of authentic Texas Mexican cuisine dating back to the original Texas Native Americans, aka, Texas Indians,
  • Fine dining and sustainable food production,
  • Emerging digital media practices and their role in eating and cooking habits
  • The role of chefs in social and political discourse
  • Recipes that are authentic but also changing.
  • Cultural identity and methods of cooking
  • Entertainment and food
  • Centralized, corporate food production,
  • Best practices and fair wages in food production and transportation,
  • Food as Art.